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The Battle of Boat: Performance to Benefit the Cathedral Youth Program

Saturday, May 11 from 5-8pm.

The American Cathedral Youth Program, in partnership with American Childrens Theatre, brings you a musical straight out of London's West End, a unique production set during WWI – and with an entirely youth cast, aptly brings home what children deal with when confronted with war.

It has been compared to “Lord of the Flies.”  There are fart jokes, stick fights, and comedic scenes that younger children have been raving about since they first saw the show in March!  Brilliantly-designed situational comedy cuts through the more serious themes to make it not just emotionally moving, but fun to watch. 

This production – appropriate for children ages 6 and up – reminds a modern audience of what children’s lives were like then, as well as what war does to a society.  Comedy, tragedy, silliness – it has it all, and will leave you in a hopeful place at the end.

Given that this is a short 6 months after the Centennial of Armistice Day, the performance will be in combination with historical panels about Paris in that time period, including poems, and highlighting the Memorial Cloister at the Cathedral (which was the first Memorial to go up to WWI in the whole world, commemorating US soldiers and civilians, - including the units who volunteered even before the US declared war).

Proceeds to benefit the American Cathedral Youth Program.

Here is a preview video of the ACT All-Stars performing “Then We’ll Fight” from the show: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1OiZEawwi5c.


Tickets are 10 euros / youth; 15 euros / adult; 40 euros / family rate  Click here to purchase.


“Weaving powerful themes of rivalry, leadership and battle…each line, note and lyric carries a punch.  The Battle of Boat is an epic piece of musical theatre!” - Jonathan Baz

“A world of mice and mud, of beastie-traps and scraped knees. A world where anything is possible if only you’re brave enough and you have your friends to help you a bit.” – London Theatre Review